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Get Prepped for Your First Lynx Ride

There’s nothing quite like that first Lynx snowmobile ride of the season — and the wait is almost over. A new season means sharper turns, further jumps and faster rides. You can practically feel the snow under your skis! But before you head out, there are a few things you need to brush up on. Beginner or veteran, preparing yourself and your Lynx snowmobile properly are paramount for smooth rides all season, starting with that first one. These tips will help you navigate the harsh terrain only a select few would dare take on. Ride fearless, friends.

The Right Gear for the Ride

Lynx riders are hardcore — but there’s more to it than an indestructible spirit. You’ve got to prepare as hard as you ride. Before even mounting your sled, armor up with the right snowmobile riding gear.

Dress to match the tough terrain you seek. To stay warm and comfortable on the snow, employ the three-layer system. What’s that? It goes like this: start with a moisture-wicking base layer nestled to the skin. Follow that up with a warmer insulating layer that still promotes moisture movement, such as fleece. Finally, consider your outer layer a shell. Its primary function is to repel the elements. From there, you can fine-tune your fit for temperature and conditions.

Now that you’ve taken care of number one, your snowmobile has to gear up too. When it comes to accessories, many riders like to start with storage. LinQ cargo accessories give Lynx riders precious extra space for those long, demanding rides. First time using LinQ? The beauty is, there’s no learning curve thanks to quick, toolless attachment, a staple of the LinQ system. Equip your sled to carry essentials like extra gloves, emergency supplies, goggles, snacks and more with just the flip of a lever. It’s that easy.

First Ride Sled Setup

Lynx sleds are built to survive winter at its harshest. So before you even hit the throttle, set up your snowmobile for success. Take a look through your operator’s manual, make note of the adjustments you might want to make… and then make them! Channel your childlike enthusiasm — start on these changes in the garage a day or two before your ride.

To stay in control of your sled out on the terrain, you’d better be set up comfortably. Start with your hands: set your handlebars to a position you feel confident with both sitting and standing. Position your throttle and brake lever to a place that’s comfortable and doesn’t strain your hands or arms. You should be able to reach these at a moment’s notice.

To ride with a purpose, your sled has to track true. A few quick adjustments: double-check your sled’s ski alignment — the skis should have a half-inch of toe out — and also take a peek at your track tension and alignment.

Before leaving the house, educate yourself on the day’s snow conditions. Early-season rides often involve spots with low snow. A no-brainer: adding a set of rail ice scratchers to help keep your sled cool in spots where snow may be hard to come by.

One final step: before any ride, be sure to check fuel, oil and coolant levels and top them off when necessary.

Ride Planning with BRP GO!

That’s right: even in snowmobiling, there’s an app for that. Download BRP GO! to your smartphone to add a virtual element to every ride.

With the app, you can access snowmobile trails across North America and plan your route right on your phone. Then, share it with your riding tribe and challenge them to join you — if they can keep up. Once you get out there, you can mount your device and ride with turn-by-turn GPS navigation, just like you would in your car. Suggestion: navigate to the end of your comfort zone. Then, hit the throttle.

Rides automatically save in the app so you can relive each twist and turn when you’re telling the story later. Next time out, you can attack the snow in a completely different way.

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